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How can I track down an old email account?

Answer

Now Look up your username in search engines Type your favorite usernames into Google, Bing, Yahoo, Ask.com, and DuckDuckGo to see where they appear online. Do a search for your name (with quotation marks around it to contain results) and email addresses as well.

How can I track down an old email account?

My dog ate my homework. No, seriously: I was in grad school and a dog ate “my” (the university’s) archive of course Web pages. It took some digging but I finally found the account that had backed them up in those days before Google Apps for Education!

Here’s what you need to know about tracking down an old email account:

Keep calm and log out : Your first step is always going to be logging out of the account you’re currently using. This will not only cut off your access to the account from any other devices/browsers, but it’ll also prevent someone else from logging in while you’re away — or accessing your password-reset email when that time comes. If you can’t remember your password — don’t panic! Google will send you a password-reset link to any account that’s been inactive for less than 18 months. (And if you haven’t logged in in over two years, it’ll delete the account.)

: Your first step is always going to be logging out of the account you’re currently using. This will not only cut off your access to the account from any other devices/browsers, but it’ll also prevent someone else from logging in while you’re away — or accessing your password-reset email when that time comes. If you can’t remember your password — don’t panic! Google will send you a password-reset link to any account that’s been inactive for less than 18 months. (And if you haven’t logged in in over two years, it’ll delete the account.) Pick a search term : Searching for your email address at google.com can be frustrating because there are so many Google-related results thrown into the mix. Instead, try searching for an alternative version of your email address first — e.g., “[email protected]” or “[email protected]” — or use advanced operators to narrow down results from all accounts:

Keep in mind that Gmail will automatically add “‘s” to housekeeping and shared addresses (“administrator’s assistant,” etc.), so use a wildcard if necessary.

: Searching for your email address at google.com can be frustrating because there are so many Google-related results thrown into the mix. Instead, try searching for an alternative version of your email address first — e.g., “[email protected]” or “[email protected]” — or use advanced operators to narrow down results from all accounts: Keep in mind that Gmail will automatically add “‘s” to housekeeping and shared addresses (“administrator’s assistant,” etc.), so use a wildcard if necessary. Do the same for another service : The old adage is true: If you don’t remember something, someone else does! And since you’ve logged out of your account, it’s time to ask around. Try searching for the full email address on Google+ (though be advised that you’ll only find accounts with “google” in their name), Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn…everywhere possible!

: The old adage is true: If you don’t remember something, someone else does! And since you’ve logged out of your account, it’s time to ask around. Try searching for the full email address on Google+ (though be advised that you’ll only find accounts with “google” in their name), Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn…everywhere possible! Make a wishlist : Is there a specific folder or message thread that stands out? Don’t forget about the Gmail search operators that can help filter your results. If there’s a specific phrase in the email (i.e., “looking forward” or a reference to another email address), use “-allin:subject:(your search term here)” to eliminate all results except the ones with those words in the subject line — e.g., “-allin:subject:”looking forward”

How to find old email from Gmail?

Is there a specific folder or message thread that stands out? Don’t forget about the Gmail search operators that can help filter your results. If there’s a specific phrase in the email (i.e., “looking forward” or a reference to another email address), use “-allin:subject:(your search term here)” to eliminate all results except those with those words in the subject line.

Unfortunately, there’s no way to tell Gmail to search for emails sent prior to X date or after Y date. It also doesn’t recognize any email at all if you type blind carbon copy (bcc:), so typed an email address instead of a name and didn’t remember that fact? Too bad—Gmail has no idea who you were talking about!

: Unfortunately, Gmail can’t do this. In its efforts to provide as much storage space as possible by eliminating file-based attachments, it uses a system whereby every attachment is stored separately on Google’s servers and linked back to your email messages through embedded links and code snippets embedded in each message. If you’re messaging other Gmail users, you can click on the attachment and download it to your computer. But if you are emailing someone who doesn’t use Gmail, then only that person (and any spam filters they may have) will ever see the attachment in the first place. When Microsoft Outlook finally integrates with Google Apps this year, we’ll be able to download attachments from all-Google messages but not those addressed to non-Gmail addresses.

: There’s no easy way to do this without doing a search for a specific message or emails containing certain words. Using an advanced Gmail filter is your best bet however at filtering on particular subjects or senders automatically. Click “Filters” in the left sidebar, then select “Create new filter” and choose “Apply the label.” For example, you could create a label called “Friends,” then apply that label to all of your contacts, regardless of who they are. Gmail will automatically drop any emails from people you don’t want in this folder into a spam or trash bin.

: While it’s tempting to keep hundreds of old addresses around for future use, Google likely won’t delete them—you have 15GB of space after all—and if anyone happens to access the account (via POP3 or forwarding) without your permission, you’ve opened up a potential security hole. If something has happened that’s caused you to lose access to an email address without also losing access to the inbox at all times.

How can I track down an old email account?

Now Look up your username in search engines Type your favorite usernames into Google, Bing, Yahoo, Ask.com, and DuckDuckGo to see where they appear online. Do a search for your name (with quotation marks around it to contain results) and email addresses as well.

How can I find all my online accounts?

1.Find any accounts linked to your email. …
2.Check your social sign-ins. …
3.Check your inbox for account verification emails. …
4.Use a third-party app to do the heavy lifting. …
5.Use your username to find all associated accounts. …
6.Check your browser’s saved accounts.


How To Find All Accounts Linked To Your Email Address
?

1.Log in to your email address.
2.Click “Manage third-party access”
3.Remove anything you don’t want.
4.Search your emails for subject lines associated with account creation.
5.Make a list of these sites and delete or reach out to remove the unwanted accounts.

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