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How do you delete a mailbox?

Answer

  1. Go to the EAC, navigate to Recipients.
  2. Go to the ”Mailboxes
  3. Click the ”mailbox” that you want to delete
  4. Click ”Delete
  5. Click Yes to delete the mailbox.

How to Delete Gmail Account Permanently

When I first read that question, my answer was: Why would you want to do that? But then I thought about it some more. Maybe someone had told me the question as part of an IT administrator interview. The easiest way is probably just to be clear on what’s involved in creating and managing mailboxes, so here goes… First let’s define our terms: A Mailbox is an Exchange object representing a user’s mail storage place on your infrastructure (see below). Most administrators will set up mailboxes for their users over time. At some point they’ll wonder whether they need all those mailboxes any longer – maybe there are people who have left the organization or they’ve decided that some users aren’t supposed to store their e-mail at that location any longer. Whatever the reason, these mailboxes need to be removed from Exchange.

In my case, there were two different types of mailboxes to deal with: User Mailbox and Shared Mailbox (see below). Of course, I started out by removing the former ones first – those belonging to users who had left. While logged on as a user with appropriate permissions, you can go into Recipient Configuration > Mailbox and click “Remove” in front of each mailbox you want to get rid of. What’s going on behind the scenes is pretty simple: The object representing the mailbox is marked for removal; related objects are also flagged (e.g. folder hierarchies), and finally, the database in which it resides is modified to show that this mailbox doesn’t exist anymore.

In my case, I had two user mailboxes that were still active but no longer required (more on why that was so later) – so when I filled out the form shown above and hit “Remove,” those mailboxes got nuked instantly. The whole process takes place without human interaction being necessary: It will take a bit longer if there’s a lot of data stored in the mailbox, so better check first whether that’s the current situation by asking Exchange for information about its contents with Get-MailboxStatistics <<MailboxId>> | Select *TotalItemSize.*. If you find out that there are large amounts of old data in there, consider running a vacation auto-responder (set up by Exchange) to inform e-mail senders that they should no longer use this mailbox for sending. At this point, you can check whether all the data was removed successfully by doing a full backup of the database containing your deleted mailboxes and then restoring it afterward – if things went fine with deleting them from Exchange, they will be gone after the recovery process.

Disable or Delete a Mailbox in Exchange 2016

If that’s not what you want: If you still have users who are supposed to store their e-mail on one of these now-abandoned mailboxes, you’ll need to put them into an “Inactive” state instead before removing them permanently. This way nobody will be affected as these mailboxes will continue to exist in Exchange and will be accessible through Outlook (see below) – although it’s not clear why users would want to use a mailbox that is officially no longer assigned to them. If you go this way, there are two things you need to do before actually removing the user mailboxes: First, don’t forget the delegation settings for these Inactive mailboxes: Open up Recipient Configuration > Mailbox and click on “Edit” in front of each mailbox that requires delegation; fill out the fields as needed; and hit OK when done (see below).

If they’re lucky enough to have an Office 365 license in addition to their Exchange Online subscription, those mailboxes can also be moved into DelegateMailbox if necessary via this Exchange Online PowerShell command:

If you happen to use the new Admin Center, go into Recipient Configuration > Mailbox and select each user mailbox you want to make inactive. Click on “Settings” in the action bar at the top and then switch the “Retention Hold” option from “Default (Blocked)” to an alternative one; finally hit Save whenever done. This way nobody will be able to send e-mail messages to these mailboxes any longer – although internally they’ll appear as still existing. Second, set up a retention policy for every now idle mailbox so that all its contents are eventually deleted. Do this by heading over to Recipients > Mailboxes; selecting the required user mailboxes in question for modification and then clicking on Properties in the action bar at the top. Switching to the “Retention” tab, select a retention policy that requires any items older than 365 days to be deleted automatically; hit OK when done (see below).

Don’t forget: If you haven’t changed your default settings yet, the default policy will require all items to be kept forever while not making exceptions when it comes to items belonging to users who no longer exist as mailboxes. That’s why you need to make sure of checking both “Delete items…” and “When deleted or moved… apply this action for all subfolders”: Doing so means that all files belonging to these mailboxes will be deleted once the retention period of 365 days has passed. When you’re done with setting up a policy for all Inactive mailboxes, hit “Save” in the action bar at the top – and make sure to check whether everything went well by doing a test run over here in your lab environment…

And now what? If it’s summertime: Great! You might want to spend some time on vacation yourself while Exchange does its thing when running that retention policy – but don’t forget to do those backups first (or consider exporting them to Office 365 Table Storage / Azure Blob Storage). If it’s any other season than summer: That’s unfortunate, but there is no alternative way around this. As already mentioned, you could only restore a single mailbox containing all user data (CALS and personal e-mails alike) after running the normal recovery process; this may be your best option. If that’s not an option: Well, try to make it as quick as possible; unless you’re willing to wait until September 2017 before migrating all users over from Exchange on-premises towards Office 365.

Recovery of deleted mailboxes in Exchange Online via PowerShell Import-Module MSOnline Connect-MsolService Set-Mailbox -rogue [[email protected]] &nb sp; Get-DeletedMailbox [[email protected]] &n bsp ; Restores the given mailbox – assuming it was “soft deleted” (blocked by a retention hold) for more than 7 days and didn’t already get purged from the mailbox database (more details available here ). Import-Module MSOnline Connect-MsolService $deletedMailbox = ” [[email protected]] ” Get-MailboxStatistics $delet edMailbo x | fl DisplayName, ItemCount While ($DeletedMailb ox.DisplayNa me -eq $dele tedMa ilbox) { Get-MailboxStatistics $De letedMai lbox | fl DisplayName, ItemCount } When you’ve identified the deleted mailboxes in question: Check out how many items are still assigned to it by using these commands… …and restore them all with this one last PowerShell command: Restore-Mailbox -Identity $deletedMailb ox.DisplayName &n bsp ; No time for PowerShell? If you prefer to click around in the Exchange admin center, here’s how: Go to Recipients > Mailboxes;

Reset-Mailbox [[email protected]] will delete all e-mails currently still assigned to it and make the rogue mailbox inaccessible again (as long as its retention policy is set up correctly). Again, do not forget about proper data protection measures while handling these mailboxes! That means keeping a recent backup until everything has been properly restored – or exporting the recovery item(s) to Azure Storage / Office 365 Table Storage before starting any recovery process: In case things went wrong during recovery of user items, they might already be purged from the server by now…

Restoring deleted mailboxes in Exchange Online via PowerShell Import-Module MSOnline Connect-MsolService Set-Mailbox -rogue [[email protected]] &nb sp; Get-DeletedMailbox [[email protected]] &n bsp ; Restores the given mailbox – assuming it was “soft deleted” (blocked by a retention hold) for more than 7 days and didn’t already get purged from the mailbox database (more details available here ). Import-Module MSOnline Connect-MsolService $deletedMailbox = ” [[email protected]] ” Get-MailboxStatistics $delet edMa ilbo x | fl DisplayName, ItemCount While ($DeletedMailbox.DisplayName -eq $deletedMa ilbox) { Get-MailboxStatistics $Delet edMailbo x | fl DisplayName, ItemCount } When you’ve identified the deleted mailboxes in question: Check out how many items are still assigned to it by using these commands… …and restore them all with this one last PowerShell command: Restore-Mailbox -Identity $deletedMa ilb ox.Displa yName &nb sp; No time for PowerShell? If you prefer to click around in the Exchange admin center, here’s how: Go to Recipients > Mailboxes;

Reset-Mailbox [[email protected]] will delete all e-mails currently still assigned to it and make the rogue mailbox inaccessible again (as long as its retention policy is set up correctly). Again, do not forget about proper data protection measures while handling these mailboxes! That means keeping a recent backup until everything has been properly restored – or exporting the recovery item(s) to Azure Storage / Office 365 Table Storage before starting any recovery process: In case things went wrong during recovery of user items, they might already be purged from the server by now…

This posting is provided “AS IS” with no warranties and confers no rights. Use of included script samples is subject to the terms specified at http://disclaimer.html. Comments are welcome if they are on-topic.

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How do you delete a mailbox?

1. Go to the EAC, navigate to Recipients.
2. Go to the ”Mailboxes
3. Click the ”mailbox” that you want to delete
5. Click ”Delete
6. Click Yes to delete the mailbox.

How do you delete a mailbox on iPhone?

To delete a mailbox from your Microsoft Exchange account, first, go to the Mailboxes list and tap Edit. Tap the mailbox you want to remove. Tap Delete Mailbox. Tap Delete and then tap Finish.

How do I delete a mailbox in Mail?

Go to the Email app and tap Accounts. On the Account window, press and hold any Exchange account that is highlighted until a Menu window appears. Then click Remove Account on this Menu menu. A warning message will appear; if you want to delete your account with your selected email provider, hit Remove Account or Last Step.

Why can’t I delete a mailbox on my Mac?

To solve this, use the Mailbox tool. Click on “Mailbox” at the toolbar and select “Rebuild.” Then delete the mailbox by right-clicking or ctrl-clicking it from the drop-down menu and selecting Delete.”

How do I delete a mailbox on my Mac?

Within the Mail app on your Mac, select a mailbox in the sidebar. Tap Delete Mailbox to remove it from the server. If you have any problems with deleting an IMAP-based account, contact your provider directly for assistance.

How can I delete thousands of emails at once?

Instead of clicking a nice button, you’ll need to press and hold the Shift key. Click the first email, keep holding down Shift, click the last email, and then hit Delete.

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