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How can you find out who is behind a fake Facebook account?

Answer

To determine whether an account is fake, you should look at the three most important things: profile picture, timeline items, and personal information.

Find the Real Person behind a Fake Account || 2021

Some time back, a friend posted this comment on my Facebook timeline: “The life of an artist is so frustrating. He always wants more than he has at any given moment.” I replied to him with something like that you need to be patient and all that jazz. Another friend who reads my blog asked me why you did not reply to the original poster. She said it seemed rude for you do not do so.

I realized then how easily we fall prey to these scams that are becoming popular especially on social media sites such as Facebook and Instagram. Someone posing as an artist goes into his page, drops subtle hints about himself being frustrated or unhappy or even romantically involved with someone (usually a girl) who doesn’t understand him. Another “friend” chimes in, giving sympathy and friendship to this person who has been posting about his problems on the Internet.

I’ve seen people post links to pages that are mostly all fake by now. The suggestion is to ask for donations but nothing could be further from the truth! These pages usually support political or religious causes, so they do not necessarily look like scams straight away. Some of them even have the name of an organization such as The Red Cross or Amnesty International or some non-profit entity that does really exist and is something you can trust.

how to find fake facebook account owner

This scam works well because: 1) it’s done through spam where hundreds of random people reply and 2) there are real people in your Facebook friend list who are sympathetic to the cause. If you thought Facebook filters out spam, then think again. They do get rid of most of it but some get thru, enough to cause problems for those using Facebook as a tool for free advertising and social media marketing. The bad guys don’t care about your profile layout or anything like that. All they want is your money!

Of course, there are other ways these scammers work their magic. For example, when an artist decides to have an art opening/exhibition in his or her own gallery space (or wherever), people from all over will show up – most likely because they were invited via e-mail by the artist himself*. So when someone shows up asking questions about the event itself, everything seems perfectly normal and natural. But these people are probably thugs who may have been hired to pickpocket the guests or maybe even rob them at gunpoint!

Of course, a real gallery will not allow you to invite anyone directly through e-mail. They want as many people as possible to show up for your exhibition so they will put all sorts of creative ads in various media such as newspaper, radio, and television. Getting press coverage is essential for any successful opening… remember that!

Remember this fictional example: “A few months ago I had this friend whose wife left him because he kept on talking about the need to start an art foundation with a focus on abstract art? He was really a nice guy and we really enjoyed his company. He was even thoughtful enough to feature me in an exhibition he had in his own gallery, which really helped my career a lot! Now I hear he’s being charged with conspiracy and fraud.”

So what did these scammers do? They created a “foundation” with the purpose of helping artists develop their careers through various workshops, lectures, and all that jazz. Of course, they mention how helpful this will be for those who live on a low income or are struggling to get by. So when you click on the link it takes you to a page where you have some options: 1) make a donation, 2) share this information on your timeline page, or 3) just go back to Facebook as if nothing happened. In other words, it looks like any other event/causes you are interested in.

For example, let’s say you chose option 1 and gave them $1,000 via your credit card. You don’t feel anything wrong here because you read the page carefully and really wanted to take part in this campaign against poverty or whatever. So when you click on “make a donation” something else completely different happens! A second window opens asking for your credit card details again but this time they ask for the EXACT amount that you were supposed to donate earlier (i.e., $1,000). The bad guys got paid twice!!

But what if we remove all of these distractions by asking three simple questions: 1) Is everything above the fold (i.e., is the page optimized for mobile)? 2) Does everything make sense? 3) Are you being asked to give them money? 4) Do they look like real people or do they look like computer-generated images of human beings? These four questions will help you avoid a lot of potential problems and scams – even if it’s from your friends, family, employees, bosses, etc…

The details are above the fold because everybody should be able to see them without having to scroll down. And if we can’t find out how much the operation cost just by clicking on the links then forget about it! As far as “does everything make sense” goes – sometimes logic means nothing at all! For example, someone who is trying to raise money for a specific cause may lie about the true intention of that money. So make sure you ask them these questions! And if it looks like an ad – it’s probably an ad!

Also, be extremely careful when someone asks you for money. In most cases, they need your help and they are indirectly saying that “if you don’t donate then this project/cause/etc… will not happen.” But even though this may be a very serious issue in their minds, sending your money without really knowing why can push other people into situations where they might end up regretting what happened later on. Bottom line: never send someone else’s money without explaining to them exactly how it’ll be used. And remember: if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck – chances are that you just found something inspirational.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: George Doumani is the CEO of Accurus Technologies, an expert in Internet security, strategic planning, and management with more than 20 years of experience in IT. He holds two BSc and one MSc degree from the University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

As published in Ordinary Optimists Magazine – Issues 55–56, April 2015. Rights reserved. Original article copyright by George Doumani | Courtesy of The Zircon Files.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: George Doumani is the CEO of Accurus Technologies, an expert in Internet security, strategic planning, and management with more than 20 years of experience in IT. He holds two BSc and one MSc degree from the University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

As published in Ordinary Optimists Magazine – Issues 55–56, April 2015. Rights reserved. Original article copyright by George Doumani | Courtesy of The Zircon Files. [END OF ARTICLE]

I’ve always been a tech-savvy person. And even though I use a computer for most things these days (including creating this piece) I still try to stay away from technological solutions when everything else will work just fine. For example, I never use a smartphone. At times it’s good to go back to basics and see how things really work!

But even though you can find real beauty in simplicity there are always people who need things to be more complicated than they really are. This is especially true in today’s holistic world of technology where computer-generated images (CGI) have advanced from simple animated characters into “almost believable” robots that look like human beings – which means that when you’re talking with someone on the phone or via video chat it’s sometimes hard to distinguish between the two.

How can you find out who is behind a fake Facebook account?

To determine whether an account is fake, you should look at the three most important things: profile picture, timeline items, and personal information.

Can someone trace a fake Facebook?

Yes, you can be traced. A vast number of requests that we have received are related to fake Facebook profiles. This is why we’ve published a new article about how to trace spam or a fake account on Facebook often mistaken for REAL people!

How do I find out who owns a Facebook account?

To find the details of a Facebook business page, visit the “About” section. If there is no other information about who owns the page, send them a private message and request it.

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