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How do I unlock a user account in Ubuntu?

Answer

Checking the user account locked status using passwd command. # passwd -S daygeek or # passwd –status daygeek # Alternate: In some cases, it is necessary to use the /etc/shadow file when running a collective of commands.

How to unlock an user account in Ubuntu

To unlock a user account in Ubuntu, use the following command: sudo passwd username. Replace the username with the name of the username. You will be asked to enter and then confirm a new password.

How do I sign into Ubuntu?

To sign into Ubuntu, follow these steps: Log out of your current session if you’re not already logged in. Press Alt+F2. A Run Application/Terminal window appears. Type “gnome-session-properties”. Press Enter. Click on the drop-down menu next to “Default Applications”, and select “Window Manager” or “Other…” depending upon your version of Linux Mint / MATE / Cinnamon). Click on the drop-down menu next to this selection and select “Mate”. Click the Close button to close the window. Click on your username in the top right-hand corner of the screen. A menu will appear; select “Sign Out” and click on it. Log back into Ubuntu using either a similar user account or the newly created account that you unlocked earlier.

How do I unlock a file?

To unlock a file, follow these steps: Right-click on it and select Properties from the popup menu. Select Permissions in the left pane of this window (or Attributes if using Nautilus). Locate Owner in this list. If it doesn’t already have a checkmark next to it, select Owner and press Enter. Type your password and press Enter again. Click the Close button at the bottom of this window.

How do I lock a file?

To lock a file, follow these steps: Right-click on it and select Properties from the popup menu. Select Permissions in the left pane of this window (or Attributes if using Nautilus). Locate Owner in this list. Press Enter next to it so that it has a checkmark next to it. Click on Close at the bottom of this window.

How does Alt + Tab work? Why is my desktop switching when I press Alt+Tab? Is there any way around it?

Ubuntu uses Compiz for switching windows between applications. It also allows certain programs (such as Firefox) to put up a window when you press Alt+Tab.

You can configure Compiz to not switch between desktops. To do this, launch the CompizConfig Settings Manager and go through to the Keybindings tab, then press Ctrl+Alt+F7 (or whatever key is listed in Keyboard Shortcut as “Switch desktop”) and change it from anything other than “Global” or “None”. My Desktop Switches When I Press Alt+TabUbuntu use Compiz for switching windows between applications. It also allows certain programs (such as Firefox) to put up a window when you press Alt+Tab. You can configure Compiz to not switch between desktops. To do this, launch and go through to the tab, then press(or whatever key is listed inas “Switch desktop”) and change it from anything other than “Global” or “None”.

How do I turn on the microphone?

Just bring up a terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and type :

Go to apps > gnome-sound-recorder > muted. Check if muted is set to true. If it is not, set it to true. This will unblock your microphone so that you can use any application with sound recording capabilities (such as Audacity). Recording Sounds in UbuntuJust bring up a terminal () and type: Go to apps > gnome-sound-recorder > muted. Check if muted is set to true. If it is not, set it to true. This will unblock your microphone so that you can use any application with sound recording capabilities (such as Audacity).

How do I find a command?

To search for all packages that contain the word “tasks”, type :

This will bring up a list of similar commands and their location in the repositories: To find out what a specific package does or how to use a certain command in Ubuntu, you can run aptitude or apt-get . Both are very powerful methods for searching through packages within repos. To search for all packages that contain the word “tasks”, type :This will bring up a list of similar commands and their location in the repositories:

How do I set my homepage?

To change your home page, click here, then select Edit -> Preferences -> Web Browser. This will open the browser’s preferences. Check “Open this page as my Home Page” and fill in the address for your preferred home page ( http://www.google.com ). If you want to change any other settings, go ahead and adjust them now too! Your default web browser is Firefox. To change your home page, click here, then select Edit -> Preferences -> Web Browser. This will open the browser’s preferences. Check and fill in the address for your preferred home page ( http://www.google.com ). If you want to change any other settings, go ahead and adjust them now too!

How do I send pictures via e-mail?

To send a picture file in Firefox: Click the File icon in the address bar (to the left of the “New Tab” button) Select Send… from the menu next to the File icon Fill out your recipient’s address information and CC info in the form that pops up Under Attachments, click Choose Files Find your picture file(s) on your computer Select those files then click Open Check Compress Files if you want your picture file(s) compressed before being sent To send a single picture using Thunderbird, follow these steps: Click File -> Attach… . Under Attach, click on the folder icon to open your file manager. Navigate to the picture you want to send and select it. Select Open then OK (to return to Thunderbird) Enter recipient information as needed, and select Send To send a single picture using Evolution, follow these steps: Click File -> Email message In the window that pops up, clicks New Message. Enter recipient information as needed Then find the picture you want to attach in your computer’s file system (on Windows machines this is done by clicking Browse ). Once you have selected your image(s), right-click on one of them and choose “Send…”>Edit Recipients>Next Right-Click again on one of your selected pictures and choose “send”

How do I backup my data?

You’ve probably heard of the saying, “Backup, Backup, Backup!”. Well, this couldn’t be any more true! You never know when you might need to restore a file or set up your computer again from scratch. So don’t take chances…make backups regularly! For most people, it’s recommended that you back up data at least once a week (and daily if possible). Nowadays there are many ways to accomplish this task: Google Drive, Dropbox, external hard drives, home servers, etc. Whatever method you use is completely up to you, just make sure that you’re doing something!

Here are some useful links regarding backing up your data:

First thing you should do is to see if you can get your computer to boot into another operating system. If it will, run the Ubuntu Live CD in the other operating system and try from there. Otherwise, see below for instructions on how to create an Ubuntu Bootable USB Flash Drive. This can be used to boot a non-working computer into Ubuntu and thus test whether or not the problem is with Windows itself or with the hardware itself (it’s probably the former). You may also want to try these things before doing anything else: Try starting your machine while holding down the shift key during startup. Your machine will attempt safe mode with networking. If this works, great! Let’s try and find a solution. Next, you may want to try doing the following things: At this point, you should search for information about your specific error (a Google search is highly recommended). I can’t tell you exactly how to fix it since there are so many different types of errors that affect computers. But perhaps someone else has already had the same problem as yours and found some solution or workaround. If not, then we’ll have to get our hands dirty and work on it ourselves.

What if my computer won’t start at all? Or what if there was nothing wrong with Windows but Ubuntu still won’t boot properly? Well in these cases what you’ll need to do is create a Ubuntu Bootable USB Flash Drive . This can be used to boot a non-working computer into Ubuntu and thus test whether or not the problem is with Windows itself or with the hardware itself (it’s probably the former).

How do I unlock a user account in Ubuntu?

Checking the user account locked status using passwd command. # passwd -S daygeek or # passwd –status daygeek # Alternate: In some cases, it is necessary to use the /etc/shadow file when running a collective of commands.

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