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I change my primary Google account on Android?

Answer

  1. On Android Open the Settings app.
  2. Tap on Google/Google Settings.
  3. Tap on next to the current default Google account.
  4. Tap a different account.


Most Android users have more than one Google account. By default, your main email address is linked to all of your apps and services on Android, but you can change the primary Google account easily. In fact, if you use multiple accounts with any combination of Gmail or non-Gmail addresses (such as Outlook or Yahoo Mail), you’ll likely need to make a change at some point. Follow these steps:

Open the Settings app and tap Accounts . Tap Add Account . If necessary, tap Existing ; then tap Google , and enter your username and password for your primary Google ID. After successfully signing in, you’ll see that account as Primary under “Accounts” within the Accounts section. You can check other accounts by tapping on them; they’ll show up as Secondary .

You can’t change your default payment method associated with a certain Google account, nor can you swap accounts for the purpose of making purchases. You also won’t be able to remove accounts from your device. However, your phone will display notifications that come in through any account (you’ll need to dismiss each one individually), and if there’s an emergency notification from an app or service connected to a secondary account, you’ll see it listed along with alerts for your primary Google ID.

Switching between multiple Google accounts on Android isn’t quite as easy as doing so on Windows Phone—at least not yet. With WP 8.1 , Microsoft has introduced “Sign-in options” at the system level, which lets you “Set up Microsoft accounts for apps and services,” along with a list of all linked accounts. And while changing the primary account is as easy as swiping from right to left over your chosen account and tapping the Settings icon, keeping track of other secondary accounts isn’t quite so convenient (though you can still check them by manually opening each one).

Indeed, Android’s approach requires a few additional steps: First, you must open the individual app or service in question and then click your username at the top-right corner. You’ll see a dropdown menu; select Sign out , followed by Sign in . Then tap the Search icon within that same menu—this opens Google Settings on Chrome OS or the Play Store on Android. Select the account you want to use by tapping on it; then tap Switch .

As a general rule, though, I find that signing in and out of secondary accounts within individual apps is much easier than making a change at the system level.

Regardless of how you proceed, remember that Google services usually require your permission before they access data from other connected accounts—the exception is when you’re signed up for multiple Gmail addresses. At that point, your phone can automatically combine email messages across all your linked IDs into one place so that you can read or respond to them within Gmail. And if you create a new contact card while logged in with multiple identities, those contacts will be merged as well. The same for calendar entries and other data.

If you find that your phone is about to create a duplicate contact from merging two different accounts, you can either merge the contacts manually or add one as an alternate . However, in most cases Android will automatically merge any duplicates on its own—as long as all of your connected accounts are Gmail addresses.

You may also see “multiple Google Accounts” mentioned within Play Services , which refers to any number of linked Google IDs on your device—including but not limited to multiple Gmail addresses. This shouldn’t be confused with the secondary account feature discussed above; if you tap that entry, it’ll take you directly into the Settings app where you can add another account, switch between existing ones, or remove them from your device altogether.

Remember that each account you add is a storage quota unto itself—that is, if you have two Gmail accounts (where one might have been used to upload videos from overseas) and an NFC-based payment account on your device, the space consumed by all three will be listed separately within Settings > Storage in Android 4.4 KitKat . Even so, it’s not quite as clear as Microsoft’s approach: Android doesn’t directly show how much total storage space is consumed by linked accounts.

Storing more data for offline use with Chrome on Windows Phone

I’m a big fan of using Google Now card widgets to check my upcoming appointments before I leave home in the morning. But what I really enjoy is the ability to browse my local weather forecast without having to connect to the Internet—that way, I know whether I should grab a light jacket or expect it to be sunny out before heading out. And in order for Google Now to do its thing offline, you need two essential ingredients: A supported device running Android 4.1 Jelly Bean (or later) and an active data connection.

Here’s where things get interesting. Say you’re on your home Wi-Fi network, but your smartphone has no cellular connectivity at the moment—perhaps because you forgot to pay your monthly bill. In that case, Google Now will prompt you that “You are not connected to the internet,” but is unable to show any cards offline . That’s because you need to connect following Android 4.1’s security protocols, a process that involves entering your Wi-Fi network password—even if you have a verified Google account with two-factor authentication enabled.

Verifying that you are who you say you are through text confirmations after entering the wrong password three times isn’t exactly convenient when all I want is a weather report before heading out for the evening. So here’s how I get around it: When I first log into Chrome OS on our Dell Chromebook 11 , I change my sign in credentials and select Chrome Sync as part of the setup process . That way, any later instance of Chrome OS will allow me to access Google services without having to re-enter my information—even if offline data isn’t normally supported.

Even if you don’t have Chrome OS, you should be able to take advantage of this offline support with most modern Android devices capable of running KitKat—even if the screens are locked and the data connection appears to be offline, there’s a pretty good chance that your device is still syncing in the background. If it’s not, open up Chrome on any other network-connected device (such as a Windows or Mac PC), navigate to any Google service you’d like to use offline and log in—after which those pages will automatically sync onto your smartphone once its data connection returns.

Microsoft offers an easy way for Windows Phone users to store more apps, photos, music and other files locally on their devices, helping to free up space on your device and improve performance—and all you have to do is link your Microsoft account with an app in the Windows Phone Store.

The first time you perform a search in the Marketplace for apps, music or videos , you’ll see an option to “Add this phone to my account.” If you choose that setting, it will store your downloaded content locally, freeing up capacity on your internal storage while ensuring that you can still access all of your purchased items from any other device connected to the same Microsoft account . And considering how easy it is (unlike Android’s approach) to add multiple email addresses and payment accounts through Settings > Accounts & sync options within KitKat, there’s no reason not take advantage of this option if you’re shopping around for new content .

Microsoft offers an easy way for Windows Phone users to store more apps, photos, music and other files locally on their devices, helping to free up space on your device and improve performance—and all you have to do is link your Microsoft account with an app in the Windows Phone Store.

The first time you perform a search in the Marketplace for apps, music or videos , you’ll see an option to “Add this phone to my account.” If you choose that setting, it will store your downloaded content locally, freeing up capacity on your internal storage while ensuring that you can still access all of your purchased items from any other device connected to the same Microsoft account . And considering how easy it is (unlike Android’s approach) to add multiple email addresses and payment accounts through Settings > Accounts & sync options within KitKat, there’s no reason not take advantage of this option if you’re shopping around for new content .

Microsoft offers an easy way for Windows Phone users to store more apps, photos, music and other files locally on their devices, helping to free up space on your device and improve performance—and all you have to do is link your Microsoft account with an app in the Windows Phone Store.

How do I change my primary Google account on Android?

1. On Android Open the Settings app.
2. Tap on Google/Google Settings.
3. Tap on next to the current default Google account.
4. Tap a different account.

How do I change my default Google account on Android?

To start, swipe down from the top of your phone’s screen (once or twice depending on the manufacturer) and then tap the gear icon to open the “Settings” menu. Scroll down until you see Google listed at the top of your screen.

Why does my Google account keep switching?

Some of your accounts have different settings. You might for example be using Google Apps for your work and regular Gmail when you use it in a personal account.

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