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What happened to my old Myspace account?

Answer

We’ve transferred your photos over to the new Myspace! You can find them in the Mixes section of your profile. Think of a Mix as a photo album. … Unfortunately, if you cannot locate this old account we will be unable to assist with retrieval since the old Myspace was never transferred to the new Myspace.

Unfortunately, due to our merger with Verizon Media Group, we’ve decided to discontinue the Myspace platform. While you won’t be able to access your old account, we’d like to invite you to try out a new one—it’s even better than before

Already have an account?

Simply log in to continue. All of your old Myspace contacts will be waiting for you in your new Flickr account. Your profile photo, cover photo, activities, messages will all be the same as they were before—thanks to the magic of cookies! After logging in with your username and password from before, simply log out and back in again for all your changes to take effect. At this time, passwords will not carry over from Myspace to Flickr; however, if you want to get started creating a new password, you can start by clicking the “Forgot your password?” link at the login screen. (Note: You can only reset your password if you haven’t logged into your account from another device in the last six months.) Enjoy all of Flickr’s new features too! You’ll have a brand-new home feed, entirely redesigned mobile apps, and some snazzy new camera gear to play with.

Now that you’re here on Flickr, take a moment to learn more about our privacy policy and terms of use. If you need additional help or want to contact us for any reason, please visit our help center. Thank you!

If this was spam mail sent by hackers, then Yahoo’s support site is leaking user data?

What will happen to my data? Whom can I contact if I have any questions about the site or its terms of use? your old Yahoo account information has been carefully preserved and is accessible now on Flickr.

Can I find my old MySpace?

To create a new account, please click the button below?

Already have an account? Simply log in to continue. All of your old Yahoo contacts are waiting for you in your new Flickr account. After logging in with your username and password from before, simply log out and back in again for all your changes to take effect. At this time, passwords will not carry over from Yahoo to Flickr; however, if you want to get started creating a new password, you can start by clicking the “Forgot your password?” link at the login screen. (Note: You can only reset your password if you haven’t logged into your account from another device in the last six months.)

Enjoy all of Flickr’s new features too! You’ll have a brand-new home feed, entirely redesigned mobile apps, and some snazzy new camera gear to play with.

Now that you’re here on Flickr, take a moment to learn more about our privacy policy and terms of use. If you need additional help or want to contact us for any reason, please visit our help center. Thank you!

Sincerely, Your friends at Yahoo and Flickr?

These 2 emails were sent through the contact form on my site. I never put a Myspace or Yahoo account in any of my comments, nor did I ever enter an email address or phone number anywhere. And if you look carefully at the From address, it doesn’t even contain @yahoo.com – it’s just someone trying to trick me into clicking on a link to get more information about “my old yahoo account”.

This is not spam mail but a marketing/phishing mail from Yahoo (it was sent by their support people; [EMAIL REMOVED]). In general, marketers use a list they bought from another marketer so they’re not aware that some recipients may be offended/annoyed by their mail. Personally, I would have preferred if they just mailed all users directly (including me) and asked them to opt-in and then used a double-opt-in process so that not everyone who wants to receive such mails has to complain about spam emails later on.

One of the first things an attacker does when breaking into your computer is trying to access any account you may have (e.g., email accounts) on other services or providers. If those accounts aren’t protected with two-factor authentication, it’s relatively easy for the attackers to gain complete access and control over your data and online identity simply by using passwords they already know. This is why 2FA is so important, especially on sites like Facebook, email services like Yahoo, Google, or Microsoft.

The funny part is that many people will continue to use the same password for their main accounts which are really poorly protected. They may not even know how poor they are until it’s too late and this story serves as a great example of what can happen if you’re using your Yahoo account with an insecure password after such an event occurs.

To be able to receive emails about Yahoo service updates on security issues I had to confirm my email address by clicking on a link sent to me by a support guy from Yahoo (so, in fact, I’m using my real verified yahoo address). If the attackers manage to enter all my personal details into “the system” later on and they have access to my confirmed email address, they can get 2FA to reset emails sent to me in the future. So, if I’m ever targeted again with such attacks and it’s possible to reset my 2FA/Yahoo password unless I change those details immediately after.

Another funny part of this story is that when you write security-related mail (e.g., about how your personal account was hacked), Yahoo automatically attaches an image file of a fake policeman as shown below:

So, here we’ve got a “gunman” from the local sheriff’s department who says he just wants to “help” someone by inserting malicious code into his computer but don’t worry because he has no intention of stealing or harming anyone. I don’t know if malware authors really send emails like this but this could be done simply by changing the sender’s email address shown in Yahoo Mail. Either way, it looks weird to me and in total contradiction with what is actually happening.

When it comes to trusting any online service or website with your passwords and data, you should really consider adding 2FA protection even if it doesn’t have a password manager (you can use Google Authenticator as well). If the service sends push messages directly to your phone stating that someone tried to log in without using 2FA but somehow certain bad actors are still able to access your account at-will, I think some people might decide that their data is safer on paper.

If you don’t understand what happened here or how this was possible, I’d recommend reading my post about Password Authenticated Sessions: Hijacking In-Transit HTTP Requests from 2012 which explains all of these things in more detail. By the way, it’s also possible to hijack sessions in different ways as described there, so this story doesn’t only demonstrate a bug in Yahoo’s login process but also a design flaw.

A similar post titled How to Hijack API Requests Using “Man-In-The-Middle” Attacks was written by Peter Ewan back in 2013. Please keep in mind that such attacks are possible on any website or service even if they don’t have any bugs like the ones I’ve just described above (and yes, you can still be affected even if your account is protected with 2FA). As for this specific attack, it could be avoided or blocked by making all requests over SSL and using HSTS headers as explained.

What happened to my old Myspace account?

We’ve transferred your photos over to the new Myspace! You can find them in the Mixes section of your profile. Think of a Mix as a photo album. … Unfortunately, if you cannot locate this old account we will be unable to assist with retrieval since the old Myspace was never transferred to the new Myspace.

How can I recover my old Myspace account?

Access public accounts by searching for the social networking site  myspace.com on a search engine and entering your name in the search bar. You do not need to know your old password or create a new one to access any “public” accounts from here; you can then browse through your old photos, music, videos, “connectionsevents, and “mixes“.

Are old Myspace accounts still active?

If you were active on the internet before Facebook made its debut, odds have you had a Myspace account. … Thankfully, myspace.com is no longer around. You can still find your old profile on the site though; in other words, all those photos of yourself that made it onto your profile back then may be found if you do an internet search for them.

What happened to all my old Myspace messages?

If this is happening to you, open your Photos & Videos tab. You should see all of your old photos and videos in there. If not, then unfortunately the data from MySpace was deleted before it could be synced with the new site. It’s difficult for us to help you retrieve that information so it’s important to check out the Photos & Videos tab first.

Is Myspace still around 2020?

Yes, Despite numerous redesigns, Myspace is still up and running.

How can I recover my old Myspace account without email or username?

MySpace no longer accepts certain types of email addresses to create an account. If that’s the case for you, fill out this form in order to request ownership and change your login credentials.

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